Eric Shipton yeti snowprint revisited

So odd, so different,
it might just be real. It all started with a photograph by Eric Shipton from decades ago of a single large footprint in the snow of the Himalayan Mountains (Fig. 1). Here I simply added bones based on the apparent primate nature of the trackmaker and included gorilla pedal data for comparison.

Figure 1. Eric Shipton snowprint of Yeti with hypothetical bones and PILs applied. At top is pes of Gorilla. Ice pick for scale.

Figure 1. Eric Shipton snowprint of Yeti with hypothetical bones and PILs applied. At top is pes of Gorilla. Ice pick for scale. The impressions of digits 2 and 3 indicate logical interpretation with toe drag to avoid broken toe /#2 and nussubg toe #3 impression.

Distinct from human tracks,
the big toe of the Himalayan trackmaker is much bigger and does not extend as far as in humans. The tracks is wider than in humans. Digit 2 appears to be shorter than in humans.

Several years ago an expert of yeti and bigfoot, Dr. Jeff Meldrum,
appeared on ‘Joe Rogan Questions Everything’ #2 with Duncan Trussell (audio only, click to listen via YouTube). While Joe and Duncan tried to add levity to the discussion, Dr. Meldrum portrayed the facts as he knew them, keeping speculation to a minimum.

We touched on this subject
about a year ago earlier here.

3 thoughts on “Eric Shipton yeti snowprint revisited

  1. If we’re taking this as a real track (which I don’t think it is, but I digress), then you’ve gotten the toe placement wrong. Wladimir Tschernezky (1960) made a reconstruction of the foot that was able to produce prints identical to the one photographed by Shipton. In Tschernezky’s reconstruction there is no toe between your digits I and III (his digits I and II) and digit V is to the right of your digit V (his digit IV).

    Click to access tschernezky-1960.pdf

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