Was the AMNH Tanytrachelos ‘with child’?

Tanytrachelos ahynis (Olsen 1979, holotype AMNH 7496; holotype Fig. 1) Latest Triassic, 200 mya, was derived from Macrocnemus and was a sister to Langobardisaurus and Tanystropheus. All are tritosaur lepidosaurs in the lineage of the terrestrial ancestors of pterosaurs, the Fenestrasauria… all ultimately derived from an earlier sister to late-surviving Huehuecuetzpalli and Tijubina.

Figure 1. AMNH 7496 holotype of Tanytrachelos with original tracing from Olsen 1979. DGS colors added.

Figure 1. AMNH 7496 holotype of Tanytrachelos with original tracing from Olsen 1979. DGS colors added.

The AMNH specimen
(Fig. 1) preserved in ventral exposure, appears to have two halves of a leathery eggshell and an ‘exploded’ embryo, best described as several dozen tiny bones that should not be there, unless, perhaps this was a gravid adult… or something else, like gastroliths, undigested prey… hard to tell. In any case, some of the pectoral bones also have new identities here.

Figure 5. Hypothetical Tanystropheus embryo compared to Dinocephalosaurus embryo.

Figure 2. Hypothetical Tanystropheus embryo compared to Dinocephalosaurus embryo. These are the sorts and sizes of bones one should look for in any maternal Tanytrachelos.

Figure 1. Tanytrachelos hopping to match Gwyneddichnium tracks (see figure 2).

Figure 3. Tanytrachelos hopping to match Gwyneddichnium tracks (see figure 2).

Distinct from Langobardisaurus,
Tanytrachelos has twelve cervicals, but none were gracile. The posterior cervical ribs had large heads that kept the rods far from each centrum. Heterotopic bones were present. These appear to be elongated chevrons, as in Tanystropheus. Rare hopping prints (Fig. 2) match the size and shape of Tanytrachelos pedes.

langobardisaurus-pectoral-girdle

Figure 4. The sternal complex of several other tritosaurs. Tanytrachelos is closer to Tanystropheus, not quite like any of these related taxa, but all are informative.

The elliptical sternum
of Tanytrachelos was wide, as in Langobardisaurus (Fig. 3), but the clavicle remained gracile, as in Huehuecuetzpalli (Fig. 3). The humerus was slightly bowed. Metacarpal I aligned with the others. Metatarsal III was the longest. Digit III was the longest as in Langobardisaurus tonelloi.


References
Olsen PE 1979. A new aquatic eosuchian from the Newark Supergroup Late Triassic-Early Jurassic) of North Carolina and Virginia. Postilla 176: 1-14.
Smith AC 2011. Description of Tanytrachelos ahynis and its implications for the phylogeny of Protorosauria. PhD dissertation. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.

 

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