New Como Bluff (Latest Jurassic) pterosaurs

Bits and pieces
of new Latest Jurassic pterosaurs are coming out of aquatic deposits in western North America according to McLain and Bakker 2017. The material is 3D and not very mineralized, so it is extremely fragile.

Specimen(s) #1 – HMNS/BB 5027, 5028 and 5029
“One proximal and two distal femora match a complete femur (BYU 17214) referred to Mesadactylus. Unexpectedly, both of the BBF distal femora possess a large intercondylar pneumatopore. BYU 17214 also possesses an intercondylar pneumatopore, but it is smaller than in the BBF femora. Distal femoral pnuematicity is previously recognized only in Cretaceous azhdarchoids and pteranodontids.”

The Mesadactylus holotype and referred specimens reconstructed to match the flightless pterosaur, Sos2428.

Figure 1. The Mesadactylus holotype (Jensen and Padian 1989) nests with the North American anurognathids. Several referred specimens (Smith et al. 2004), when reconstructed nest at the base of the azhdarchidae, with Huanhepterus and the flightless pterosaur SOS 2428.  The new BYU 17214 femur is essentially identical to the femur shown here.

Earlier we looked at two specimens referred to Mesadactylus. One is an anurognathid (Fig. 1). The other is a basal azhadarchid close to Huanhepterus, not far removed from its Dorygnathus ancestors in the large pterosaur tree. Instead McLain and Bakker compare the femora with unrelated and Early Cretaceous Dsungaripterus, which convergently has a similar femur. The better match is to the basal azhdarchid, so distal femoral pneumaticity does not stray outside of this clade. By the way, it is possible that Mesadactylus was flightless.

Specimen(s) #2 – HMNS/BB 5032 (formerly JHU Paleon C Pt 5)
“A peculiar BBF jaw fragment shows strongly labiolingually compressed, incurved crowns with their upper half bent backwards; associated are anterior fangs. We suspect this specimen is a previously undiagnosed pterosaur.”

These toothy specimens were compared to two Early Cretaceous ornithocheirids, one Middle Jurassic dorygnathid, and one Latest Jurassic bird, Archaeopteryx. None are a good match. A better, but not perfect,match can be made to the Early Jurassic pre-ctenochasmatid, Angustinaripterus (Fig. 2) which has relatively larger posterior teeth than does any Dorygnathus specimen.

The HMNS BB 5032 specimen(s) probably belong to a new species of Angustinaripterus or its kin based on the relatively large posterior teeth not seen among most Dorygnathus specimens.

The HMNS BB 5032 specimen(s) probably belong to a new species of Angustinaripterus or its kin based on the relatively large posterior teeth not seen among most Dorygnathus specimens.

As before,
we paleontologists don’t always have to go to our ‘go to’ taxon list of familiar fossils. Expand your horizons and take a fresh look at some of the less famous taxa to make your comparisons. You’ll find a good place to start at ReptileEvolution.com

References
McLain MA and RT Bakker 2017. Pterosaur material from the uppermost Jurassic of the uppermost Morrison Formation, Breakfast Bench Facies, Como Bluff,
Wyoming, including a pterosaur with pneumatized femora.

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