Bambiraptor enters the LRT, a late survivor of an earlier genesis

Short one today,
both in text length and taxon height.

Figure 1. Bambiraptor figures from Burnham et al. 2000. Colors added.

Figure 1. Bambiraptor figures from Burnham et al. 2000. Colors added.

Bambiraptor feinbergi (Burnham et al. 2000; Late Cretaceous, AMNH FR 30556) was originally considered a juvenile Sauronitholestes. The brain size is the largest among Mesozoic dinosaurs. Here it nests basal to Velociraptor + Balaur in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1724+ taxa, subset Fig. x). Proportions are closer to Arachaeopteryx according to the authors.

Figure 2. Bambiraptor to scale compared to Velociraptor, Balaur, Hapolcheirus, Archaeopteryx and Gallus.

Figure 2. Bambiraptor to scale compared to Velociraptor, Balaur, Hapolcheirus, Archaeopteryx and Gallus.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on theropods leading to birds, including the two newest additions, Bambiraptor and Zanazabar.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on theropods leading to birds, including the two newest additions, Bambiraptor and Zanazabar.

We’ll look
at Zanazabar soon.


References
Burnham DA, Derstler KL, Currie PJ, Bakker RT, Zhou Z and Ostrom J H 2000. Remarkable new birdlike dinosaur (Theropoda: Maniraptora) from the Upper Cretaceous of Montana. University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions 13: 1-14.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bambiraptor

What?? No feathers on velociraptors?

Figure 1. Inside cover illustration spread for "Raptors, the Nastiest Dinosaurs" by Don Lessem, illustrated by David Peters. Don asked for a "no feathers dinosaur" so that's what he got. Don't blame the artist. I tried to persuade. Utahraptor is the big dromaeosaur here.

Figure 1. Inside cover illustration spread for “Raptors, the Nastiest Dinosaurs” by Don Lessem (1996), illustrated by yours truly, David Peters. Don asked for a “no feathers dinosaur” so that’s what he got. Don’t blame the artist. I tried to dissuade. Utahraptor is the big dromaeosaur here.

This post was inspired
by a blog and Flickerstream I ran across here and here that bemoaned the fact that my 1996 dromaeosaurids / velociraptors (Fig. 1) in “Raptors – The Nastiest Dinosaurs” did not have feathers, but did have propatagia.

Guys, I tried to add feathers, as I had done several years earlier (1989) to my own velociraptors in Gallery of Dinosaurs (Fig. 2). However, author Don Lessem insisted that no feathers appear in his book. I tried to dissuade, but was vetoed. After all, he is the author. And that was then. I’m sure Dino Don has come around to new thinking since then.

See how difficult it is to promote a new idea supported by data? Even an expert like Don Lessem balked back in 1995-6.

Figure 2. Feathered Deinonychus from A Gallery of Dinosaurs by David Peters.

Figure 2. Feathered Deinonychus from A Gallery of Dinosaurs by yours truly, David Peters. (1989). Click to enlarge.

So, there is a backstory,
as there is with other controversial aspects of my work. At present the backstory and trashed ideas are not as important as the current work. Science marches on and new data keeps coming in. So let’s stay with the current wave. If you see any other problems with my  tracings or identifications, please let me know of those issues.

References
These are kids books, not academic journals!
“A Gallery of Dinosaurs” is online here.