The human occiput and palate

We looked at the facial portion
of the human skull earlier. Today we’ll look at the occiput and palate (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Human occiput and palate. On most tetrapods these two are usually set at right angles to each other, but an upright stance has rotated the occiput to a ventral orientation.

Figure 1. Human occiput and palate. On most tetrapods these two are usually set at right angles to each other, but an upright stance has rotated the occiput to a ventral orientation.

There’s nothing new here. 
This is just an opportunity to educate myself on the human palate and occiput. Only the endotympanic (En) is a novel ossification. The occiput is a single bone here, the product of the fusion of several occipital bones. Can you find the suborbital fenestra? It’s pretty small here.

The asymmetry is interesting here.
Sure, this is an old adult, missing some teeth, but you’ll see other examples elsewhere.

Let me know
if you see any errors and they will be corrected. As you already know, everything I present here was learned only 48 hours earlier — or less.

Basal synapsid occiput wallpaper

If I get started
describing the attached image (Fig. 1), I’ll be here all night. So let’s just let this be today’s wallpaper. Enjoy. Learn about something that rarely gets compared like this. This is evolution in progress…

Figure 1. Basal synapsid occiputs in evolutionary order (left column) with regard to mammal evolution. The data come from various sources. Colorization certainly helps one see the patterns that evolution takes here.

Figure 1. Basal synapsid occiputs in evolutionary order (left column) with regard to mammal evolution. The data come from various sources. Colorization certainly helps one see the patterns that evolution takes here.

This is how I learn.
If I made any errors, please advise with data.