Ubirajara jubatus: Shoulder rods? Or long skinny leg bones?

Smyth et al. 2020
brings us a new, articulated, partial, crushed skeleton of a small Aptian (Early Cretaceouse) compsognathid theropod with interesting soft tissue. The authors compared the integumentary structures of Ubirajara jubatus to those of the standard wing bird-of-paradise. A reconstruction (Fig. 1) shows four “stiff rod-like structures projecting from its shoulders,” according to Karina Shah, writing for NewScieintist.com.

We’ve never seen anything like this,
which makes it newsy. But is it real?

This taxon will not go into the LRT
because too little is known of the skeleton (Figs, 2, 3).

Figure 1. Ubirajara illustration showing proposed four "stiff rod-like structures projecting from its shoulders."

Figure 1. Ubirajara illustration showing proposed four “stiff rod-like structures projecting from its shoulders.”

The specimen reconstruction (above) was restored
from a plate and counter plate (Fig. 2) with bones at the periphery and a big glob in the middle.

Figure 2. Plate and counter plate image and tracing from Smyth et al. 2020. The tracings were combined by Smyth et al. here in figure 3.

Figure 2. Plate and counter plate image and tracing from Smyth et al. 2020. The tracings were combined by Smyth et al. here in figure 3. Sorry for the low resolution. This is just for display.

Fortunately, Smyth et al. provided a combined tracing
(Fig. 3). Note both legs are missing.

Or are they?
Instead Smyth et al. identify two pairs of straight 15 cm rods, which you can see in their illustration above (Fig. 1). Their diagram shows BMFIs directed outside the blob, aiming toward the top of the scapula.

Occam’s Razor suggests
those paired rods emanating from the shoulders may instead be long, straight legs, knees flexing near the shoulders, splitting posteriorly as shown on the overlays (Fig. 3) toward an absent pelvis for the femur and an absent foot for the tibia. This alternate restoration is a guess based on the scant evidence shown here and an aversion to completely new structures.  But somebody has to say it, just to open this discussion. If I’m wrong, I’m wrong.

Figure 3. From Smyth et al. 2020 with overlays suggesting the possibility that the paired rods growing from the shoulders may instead just be legs with knees near the shoulders. Just a hypothesis awaiting confirmation or refutation. Here the vertebrae are also renumbered.

Figure 3. From Smyth et al. 2020 with overlays suggesting the possibility that the paired rods growing from the shoulders may instead just be legs with knees near the shoulders. Just a hypothesis awaiting confirmation or refutation. Here the vertebrae are also renumbered and the hand is reconstructed.

Anyone can make a mistake.
Even if there are four co-authors. We’ve seen this sort of thing before in Yi qi and Ambopteryx where the authors mistook a displaced ulna or radius for a novel bone, their styliform. The important thing is to not perpetuate the myth of an entirely new structure, if it is a myth. This Ubirajara example is not so clear (based on indistinct impressions) so I could be wrong. Let’s figure this out. This is the loyal opposition talking, building on the tenth man rule (from World War Z).

Figure 4. Ubirajara rough reconstruction from diagram in Smyth et al. 2020.

Figure 4. Ubirajara rough reconstruction from diagram in Smyth et al. 2020 (Fig. 3).

Has anyone else
come up with this novel hypothesis? Let me know if this leg idea can be readily refuted.


References
Smyth RSH, Martill DM, Frey E Rivera-Silva HE and Lenz N 2020. A maned theropod dinosaur from Brazil with elaborate integumentary structures. Cretaceous Research. doi:10.1016/j.cretres.2020.104686

wiki/Ubirajara_jubatus

Sciurumimus: a juvenile ornitholestid in the LRT

We looked at tiny,
feathered Sciurumimus albersdoerferi (Germany, Rauhut et al. 2012; BMMS BK 11) and larger bones-only Ornitholestes (North America) earlier as Late Jurassic sisters in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1659+ taxa). After a recent review, these two continue to nest as sisters at the base of the Microraptor (Fig. 3) + Sinornithosaurus clade. So no news here… except now let’s combine the extraordinary size difference between the two and the widely accepted observation that Sciurumimus is a juvenile.

That brings to mind: a juvenile of what?
The LRT indicates a juvenile ornitholestid (Fig. 1). The overall morphologies are strikingly similar and the size difference is appropriate. Other published studies recover other nestings.

Rauhut, et al. 2012
(Suppdata) nested Ornitholestes between ornithomimosaurs and deinonychosaurs, far from Sciurumimus, which Rauhut et al. nested Sciurumimus between an unresolved clade of giant spinosaurs + megalosaurs and giant Monolophosaurus. Like Rauhut et al., the LRT nests also nests Ornitholestes between ornithomimosaurs (+ tyrannosaurs + oviraptors + therizinosaurs) and deinonychosaurs.

Key differences in the LRT include

  1. the use of two Compsognathus specimens. The each nest at the base of their own clade, a hypothesis of interrelationships overlooked by Rauhut et al.
  2. the inclusion of three Microraptor specimens and two Sinornithosaurus specimens, adults of which are closer in size and morphology to Sciurumimus. This brings to mind the possibility that phylogenetic miniaturization and neotony played a part in the evolution of these bird-mimics. These closely related taxa were omitted by the Rauhut et al. selection process.
Figure 1. Sciurumimus compared to Ornitholestes and Microraptor to scale.

Figure 1. Sciurumimus compared to Ornitholestes and Microraptor to scale.

In their study of the wonderfully preserved
anchiornithid, Aurornis, Godefroit et al. nested Sciurumimus between Monolophosaurus + Sinraptor and Zuolong, all more primitive taxa in the LRT. In Godefroit et al. these taxa are far from Ornitholestes, which nested with another small compsognathid, Juravenator. Juravenator nests with equally small, but shorter limbed Sinosauropteryx in the LRT. Evidently few theropod studies agree with one another in the details.

Rauhut et al. 2012 reported,
“Our analysis confirms Sciurumimus as the basalmost known theropod with evidence of feather-like integument.” By contrast, in the LRT, Tawa-like, feathered Sincalliopteryx (Fig. 2) is more primitive, despite its late appearance (Early Cretaceous) in the fossil record.

Figure 4. Sinocalliopteryx currently nests as a provisional sister to Deinocheirus, awaiting the discovery of transitional sister taxa.

Figure 2. Late surviving Sinocalliopteryx currently nests basal to Late Triassic Coelophysis, derived from Late Triassic Tawa. It has the most primitive presence of feathers despite its late appearance.

Sinocalliopteryx
currently nests basal to Late Triassic Coelophysis, and was derived from Late Triassic Tawa. In the LRT, Sinocalliopteryx has the most primitive presence of feathers among theropods despite its appearance tens of millions of years later than its phylogenetic genesis.

Figure 2. Microraptor gui (IVPP V 13352) reconstructed from tracings in figure 1. There are no surprises here, except a provisional closer relationship with Compsognathus than with Velociraptor. Microraptor has a large pedal claw two, but it is not quite the killing claw seen in droamaeosaurs.

Figure 3. Microraptor gui (IVPP V 13352) reconstructed from tracings in figure 1. There are no surprises here, except a provisional closer relationship with Compsognathus than with Velociraptor. Microraptor has a large pedal claw two, but it is not quite the killing claw seen in droamaeosaurs.

The Ornitholestes + Sciurumimus + Microraptor + Sinornithosaurus clade
were bird-mimics and bird-mimic ancestors not directly related to birds or bird ancestors in the LRT.


References
Godefroit P, Cau A, Hu D-Y, Escuillié F, Wu, W and Dyke G 2013. A Jurassic avialan dinosaur from China resolves the early phylogenetic history of birds. Nature. 498 (7454): 359–362.
Rauhut OWM, Foth C, Tischlinger H and Norell MA 2012.
 Exceptionally preserved juvenile megalosauroid theropod dinosaur with filamentous integument from the Late Jurassic of Germany. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 109 (29): 11746–11751.

 

 

Resurrecting extinct taxa: Pareiasauria, Compsognathidae and Ophiacodontidae

Earlier we looked at
four clades thought to be extinct, but are not extinct based on their nesting in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1366 taxa). Today, three more:

Figure 2. Another gap is filled by nesting E. wuyongae between Bunostegos and Elginia at the base of hard shell turtles in the LRT.

Figure 1. Another gap is filled by nesting E. wuyongae between Bunostegos and Elginia at the base of hard shell turtles in the LRT.

Pareiasauria
According to Wikipedia, “Pareiasaurs (meaning “cheek lizards”) are an extinct group of anapsid reptiles classified in the family Pareiasauridae. They were large herbivores that flourished during the Permian period.”

In the LRT two clades of turtles (Fig. 1) are derived in parallel from two small horned pareiasaurs.

Figure 1. Lately the two clades based on two specimens of Compsognathus (one much larger than the other) have merged recently.

Figure 2.  Lately the two clades based on two specimens of Compsognathus (one much larger than the other) have merged recently.

Compsognathidae
According to Holtz 2004, “The most inclusive clade containing Compsognathus longipes but not Passer domesticsus.” Traditionally Compsognathus nests outside the Tyrannoraptora, a clade that traditionally leads to birds.

In the LRT Compsognathus specimens nest at the base of several theropod clades (Fig. 2) including the tyrannosaurs and Mirischia, Ornitholestes and the feathered theropods leading to birds.

Figure 1. Varanosaurus, Ophiacodon, Cutleria and Ictidorhinus. These are taxa at the base of the Therapsida. Ophiacodon did not cross into the Therapsida, but developed a larger size with a primitive morphology. This new reconstruction of Ophiacodon is based on the Field Museum (Chicago) specimen. Click to enlarge.

Figure  3. Varanosaurus, Ophiacodon, Cutleria and Ictidorhinus. These are taxa at the base of the Therapsida. Ophiacodon did not cross into the Therapsida, but developed a larger size with a primitive morphology. This new reconstruction of Ophiacodon is based on the Field Museum (Chicago) specimen. Click to enlarge.

Ophiacodontidae
According to Wikipedia, “Ophiacodontidae is an extinct family of early eupelycosaurs from the Carboniferous and Permian. Ophiacodontids are among the most basal synapsids, an offshoot of the lineage which includes therapsids and their descendants, the mammals. The group became extinct by the Middle Permian.”

In the LRT Ophiacodon (Fig. 3) and Archaeothyris, neither members of the Pelycosauria, are more directly related to basal therapsids, including derived the therapsids: mammals.

References
Holtz TR 2004. Basal tetanurae. PP. 71–110 in The Dinosauria, U of California Press.

/wiki/Pareiasaur
wiki/Ophiacodontidae

 

Masiakasaurus: a large compsognathid, not a ceratosaur/abelisaur

This new taxon examination began with
a recent paper by Delcourt 2018 on ceratosaur palaeobiology that included Masiakasaurus (famous for its strong procumbent dentition, Fig. 1). When I looked at the restored skull in Delcourt 2018, figure 2, alongside other abelisaur/ceratosaur skulls, I was struck by the thought, first voiced by Ernie on Sesame Street, “One of these things is not like the other.” Other funny examples are here.

Figure 1. Masiakasaurus drawings from Carrano, Loewen and Sertic 2011) with photos from same.

Figure 1. Masiakasaurus drawings from Carrano, Loewen and Sertic 2011) with photos from same.

Delcourt 2018 reported,
“Ceratosaur theropods ruled the Southern Hemisphere until the end of the Late Cretaceous. However, their origin was earlier, during the Early Jurassic, a fact which allowed the group to reach great morphological diversity.” Perhaps there is just a little too much diversity in Delcourt’s taxon list. See below.

Masiakasaurus knopfleri (Sampson, Carrano and Forster 2001; Carrano, Loewen and Sertic 2011) was originally considered a ‘bizarre predatory dinosaur’ related to abelisaurids like Majungasarus. Here, in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1240 taxa) Masiakasaurus is related to Tianyuraptor, which also has procumbent teeth and a long torso. Essentially Masiakasaurus is a larger compsognathid leading to giant tyrannosaurs, not far from larger ornithomimosaurs (Fig. 4).

Figure 2. Tianyuraptor skull in situ and reconstructed.

Figure 2. Tianyuraptor skull in situ and reconstructed.

Other taxa with a descending anterior dentary with teeth
include Tianyuraptor (Fig. 2) and the large Compsognathus (CNJ79, Fig. 3) both of which share a long list of traits with Masiakasaurus. All of these taxa have really long cervical ribs.

Figure 1. The large (from Peyer 2006) and small Compsognathus specimens to scale. Several different traits nest these next to one another, but at the bases of two sister clades. Note the differences in the forelimb and skull reconstructions here. There may be an external mandibular fenestra. Hard to tell with the medial view and shifting bones.

Figure 3. The large (from Peyer 2006) and small Compsognathus specimens to scale. Several different traits nest these next to one another, but at the bases of two sister clades. Note the differences in the forelimb and skull reconstructions here. There may be an external mandibular fenestra. Hard to tell with the medial view and shifting bones.

Figure 4. Subset to the LRT focusing on Masiakasaurus and kin.

Figure 4. Subset to the LRT focusing on Masiakasaurus and kin.

Taxon exclusion plagues the Delcourt paper. Neither Tianyuraptor nor Compsognathus are mentioned in the text. Nor could I find the taxon Masiakasaurus mentioned with these two.

Inappropriate taxon inclusion. Like Tianyuraptor, Limusaurus also should not have been included as a ceratosaur. The LRT nests Limusaurus with oviraptorids.

When Masiakasaurus was first described
by Sampson et al. 2001, the authors reported, “[Masiakasaurus] is unique in being the only known theropod with a highly procumbent and distinctly heterodont lower dentition. Such a derived dental morphology is otherwise unknown among dinosaurs.” Actually, and this was easy to overlook, the large Compsognathus (Fig. 3) was known since Bidar et al., 1972, but it is more conservative in this feature. Tianyuraptor was reported several years later, in 2010 and the anterior dentary is broken and flipped in situ (Fig. 2). Fukuivenator is known from bits and pieces.

Addendum from Mickey Mortimer:
“Etrigansauria [from the Delcourt paper] is just a junior synonym of Neoceratosauria, which is basically ignored by Delcourt.  The phylogenetic taxonomy in this paper is horrible, ignoring Phylocode Article 11.7, ignoring earlier and better definitions than those of Wilson et al. (2003), redefining Ceratosauroidea as if it were Abelisauroidea, proposing definitions that only work in the topology being used, and citing incorrect definitions for Elaphrosaurinae, Noasaurinae and Furileusauria.  More details on my blog-“

http://theropoddatabase.blogspot.com/2018/06/etrigansauria-unnecessary-demon.html

References
Bidar AL, Demay L and Thomel G 1972b. Compsognathus corallestris,
une nouvelle espèce de dinosaurien théropode du Portlandien de Canjuers (Sud-Est de la France). Annales du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Nice 1:9-40.
Carrano MT, Loewen MA and Sertic JJW 2011. 
New materials of Masiakasaurus knopfleriSampson, Carrano, and Forster, 2001, and implications for the morphology of the Noasauridae (Theropoda: Ceratosauria). Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology. 95: 53pp.
Delcourt R 2018. Ceratosaur palaeobiology: new insights on evolution and ecology of the southern rulers. Nature.com/scientificreports 8:9730 | DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-28154-x
Lü J and Brusatte SL 2015. A large, short-armed, winged dromaeosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Early Cretaceous of China and its implications for feather evolution. Scientific Reports 5, 11775; doi: 10.1038/srep11775.
Sampson SD, Carrano MT and Forster CA 2001. A bizarre predatory dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. Nature. 409 (6819):504–506. doi:10.1038/35054046.
|Zheng X-T; Xu X; You H-L; Zhao, Qi; Dong Z 2010. A short-armed dromaeosaurid from the Jehol Group of China with implications for early dromaeosaurid evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 277 (1679): 211–217.

wiki/Tianyuraptor
wiki/Masiakasaurus
wiki/Fukuivenator

 

Huaxiagnathus: yet another basal tyrannosauroid!

Updated May 23, 2016 with a deeper maxilla posterior to the antorbital fenestra. This was needed, as pointed out by M. Mortimer, to house the tooth roots. I missed the splinter that made the difference and someday may try to trace the palatal elements, which I have avoided at present. 

Huaxiagnathus orientalis
(Hwang et al. 2004, Fig. 1) was originally considered a large compsognathid. The Hwang et al tree (now 12 years old) nested Huaxiagnathus with Compsognathus and Sinosauropteryx in the clade Compsognathidae, derived from a sister to Ornitholestes, and basal to therizinosaurs, alvarezsaurs, oviraptors, birds, and deinonychosaurs.

Figure 1. Huaxiagnathus in situ with reconstructed skull, pes, manus and pelvis. Note the relatively large pedal digit 3, the large hyoid, and the twisty lacrimal. Hwang et al. did not provide a reconstruction.

Figure 1. Huaxiagnathus in situ with reconstructed skull, pes, manus and pelvis. Note the relatively large pedal digit 3, the large hyoid, and the twisty lacrimal. Hwang et al. did not provide a reconstruction.

Here
in the large reptile tree Huaxiagnathus nests at the base of the tyrannosauroids, between Tianyuraptor + Fukuivenator and Zhenyuanlong. Yet, another heresy…

Hwang et al. reported the absence of a sternum. 
That’s odd because all current sisters have a sternum. The fossil was collected by farmers, but no preparator was mentioned. Perhaps there was a village preparator. After many tests  conducted by AMNH personnel, the fossil was determined to be genuine, singular and not a chimaera. Given the presence of both humeri where they are, the sternum should be between them. It is not, so one wonders if the sternum was removed by the preparators to expose the underlying humerus. A DGS tracing appears to show the remains of a posterior sternum (Fig. 2, magenta, contra Hwang et al.).

Figure 2. Pectoral region of Huaxiagnathus with various elements colored for clarity. The magenta bone appears to be posterior rim of a sternum, overlooked or considered an elbow by Hwang et al.

Figure 2. Pectoral region of Huaxiagnathus with various elements colored for clarity. The magenta bone appears to be posterior rim of a sternum, overlooked or considered an elbow by Hwang et al. A second overlay colorizes bits and pieces of the possible sternum extending toward the coracoids.

The Hwang et al. diagnosis reports: 
“Differs from other known compsognathids in having

  1. a very long posterior process of the premaxilla that overlaps the antorbital fossa,
  2. a manus as long as the lengths of the humerus and radius combined,
  3. large manual unguals I and II that are subequal in length and 167% the length of manual ungual III,
  4. a first metacarpal that has a smaller proximal transverse width ( i.e. “narrower”) than the second metacarpal and
  5. a reduced olecranon process on the ulna.”

Comments:

  1. The premaxilla doesn’t overlap the maxillary fossa, but tyrannosaurs have a similar long posterior process
  2. true! and no related taxa share this trait, even those with more bird-like morphologies
  3. okay… but that’s a pretty exact percentage for ungual three! (similar to Zhenyuanlong, though)
  4. if so, then just barely a smaller transverse width
  5. as in several basal tyrannosauroid sisters
  6. Not mentioned above, but those pedal proportions seem unique, with a dominant pedal digit 3. The hyoid is enormous. So few and so large are the maxillary teeth that they seem to be unusual, especially compared to the tiny teeth of Compsognathus. There seem to be many ossified stiffening element scattered throughout the vertebral column. Higher resolution should solve this problem.

Like tyrannosauroids
Huaxinagnathus had a short neck and large skull longer than the cervicals and just about as long as half the presacral length. The convex maxilla orients the premaxilla into an ‘up’ orientation. The quadratojugal, here broken into several parts, has a mushroom dorsal process that meets a squamosal ‘lid’. The lacrimal has the familiar tyrannosaur-ish in and out twist. The the maxillary teeth are BIG and few.

Figure 3. Huaxiagnathus skull with elements colorized and reconstructed in figure 4. Orignal tracing is in black outline. Many of the bones are broken.

Figure 3. Huaxiagnathus skull with elements colorized and reconstructed in figure 4. Orignal tracing is in black outline. Many of the bones are broken.

A reconstruction puts the elements
back into their in vivo positions (Fig. 4). Many of the bones are broken and had to be repaired. The scleral elements are scattered.

Figure 4. Huaxiagnathus skull and hyoid reconstructed. See figure 4b for other clade member skulls.

Figure 4. Huaxiagnathus skull and hyoid reconstructed. See figure 4b for other clade member skulls.

Basal theropod subset of the large reptile tree
shows the nesting of Huaxiagnathus in the basal tyrannosauroids (Fig. 5). Both Compsognathus specimens have a most recent common ancestor, with no intervening taxa. Huaxiagnathus, originally considered a compsognathid is one if the whole clade is considered the Compsognathidae. Otherwise, Only Struthiomimus and the Compsognathus holotype form a clade and are sisters. The CNJ79 specimen of Compsognathus is not the adult form of the holotype (contra Peyer 2006), but deserves a new generic name.

Figure 1. Basal theropod subset of the large reptile tree showing troodontids basal to birds and separate from dromaeosaurs.

Figure 5. Basal theropod subset of the large reptile tree showing the two Compsognathus specimens. Hauxiagnathus is a basal tyrannosauroid derived from a sister to Compsognathus.

So…
with every new taxon repairs do get made to the large reptile tree, but the tree topology does not change very often. The theropod subset just keeps growing without shifting around. You would think that if there were enough scoring mistakes the tree topology would change. The key thought here is that some repairs actually cement relationships. The repairs typically, but not always, remove misinterpreted ‘autapomorpies.’ For instance, the ilium of Zhenyuanlong was earlier misinterpreted as having a longer anterior process, which would be an autapomorphy for the clade. A reexamination revealed the relatively longer posterior process (Fig. 6). So, it’s true what they say about me, I don’t get it right the first time all the time.

Figure 6. Zhenyuanlong has a new ilium with a shorter anterior process.

Figure 6. Zhenyuanlong has a new ilium with a shorter anterior process that was earlier misinterpreted.

Huaxiagnathus further cements
the relationships of Zhenyuanlong, Tianyuraptor and Fukuivenator to the tyrannosaurs (contra Hone 2016) and Brusatte (2015). For its size, it looks like one (Fig. 7) with robust lower limbs, large teeth on a curved maxilla, a large head relative to the neck and torso. And don’t forget to picture this skeleton with lots of feathers as in Zhenyuanlong (Fig. 6).

Figure 7. Huaxiagnathus reconstructed in lateral view.

Figure 7. Huaxiagnathus reconstructed in lateral view, sans feathers.

References
Brusatte S 2015. Rise of the Tyrannosaurs. Scientific American 312:34-41. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0515-34
Hwang SN. Norell MA, ji Q and Gao K-Q 2004. A large compsognathid from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2(1):13-30.

wiki/Huaxiagnathus

The large French Compsognathus specimen

Updated May 23, 2016 with a new mandible. M. Mortimer pointed out correctly that I had traced two coincident mandibles as one. 

The less well-known
French specimen of Compsognathus corallestris (Bidar et al. 1972b; Peyer 2006; CNJ79) is a bit larger with a different morphology (Fig. 1) than the coeval smaller Bavarian Solnhofen specimen, Compsognathus longipes (Fig. 1 right). Dr. Peyer considers these two Late Jurassic theropods conspecific and representative of ontogenic rather than phylogenetic variation.

Figure 1. The large (from Peyer 2006) and small Compsognathus specimens to scale. Several different traits nest these next to one another, but at the bases of two sister clades. Note the differences in the forelimb and skull reconstructions here. There may be an external mandibular fenestra. Hard to tell with the medial view and shifting bones.

Figure 1. The large (from Peyer 2006) and small Compsognathus specimens to scale. Several different traits nest these next to one another, but at the bases of two sister clades. Note the differences in the forelimb and skull reconstructions here. There may be an external mandibular fenestra. Hard to tell with the medial view and shifting bones.

From the Peyer abstract:
“The absence of an external mandibular fenestra, dorsally fan-shaped dorsal neural spines with hook-shaped ligament attachments, and a  very short McI and a PhI-1, which is stouter than the radius distinguish compsognathids from other coelurosaurs. Anatomical and morphological characters of the Bavarian specimen of Compsognathus are nearly identical to those of the French specimen. The differences are related to ontogenetic or within-species variation or are caused by preservational factors. Therefore this study proposes that C. corallestris is a subjective junior synonym of Compsognathus longipes from Bavaria.”

You’ll note that “compsognathids” sensu Peyer are scattered throughout this large reptile tree subset of the Theropoda (Fig. 2). Sinocalliopteryx and Juravenator are widely considered compsognathids, yet both nest far from one another here.

I tested the ontogenetic hypothesis of Peyer
in the large reptile tree. Indeed, the two Compsognathus specimens do nest next to one another, but at the bases of two different clades.

The smaller Compsognathus specimen
nested with Struthiomimus, Ornitholestes, Microraptor and T-rex, among others.

The large Compsognathus specimen
nested with the oviraptorid, Khaan, Limusaurus, therizinosaurs, Sinosauropteryx and others. More derived clades include Eotyrannosaurus and other paravians such as dromareosaurids, troodontids and birds.

Figure 2. Compsognathus corrallensis nests close to the holotype smaller specimen, but at the base of the next clade, which includes oviraptors, therizinosaurs, Juravenator and Sinosauropteryx.

Figure 2. Compsognathus corrallensis nests close to the holotype smaller specimen, but at the base of the next clade, which includes oviraptors, therizinosaurs, Juravenator and Sinosauropteryx. That means it is not the adult version of the smaller specimen.

The new reconstruction
of the large Compsognathus skull is relatively shorter. Both the premaxilla and the dentary tip are oriented slightly down. The bones of the mandible slid apart during taphonomy. Put them back together to match the skull length and you might get a mandibular fenestra, as also seen in the smaller Compsognathus. The new skull reconstruction (Fig. 1) was created using DGS, not freehand as in the Peyer reconstruction.

Figure 3. DGS tracing of large French Compsognathus skull. These parts were used to make the reconstruction in figure 1. Only the left side and top elements were colorized.

Figure 3. DGS tracing of large French Compsognathus skull. These parts were used to make the reconstruction in figure 1. Only the left side and top elements were colorized.

Current traditional compsognathids include the following taxa

  1. Compsognathus
  2. Sinocalliopteryx
  3. Juravenator (some say yes, others say no)
  4. Sinornithosaurus
  5. Huaxiagnathus

In the large reptile tree the clade that includes Compsognathus now include the following taxa

  1. Compsognathus
  2. all ornithomimids, including Struthiomimus

References
Bidar AL, Demay L and Thomel G 1972b. Compsognathus corallestris,
une nouvelle espèce de dinosaurien théropode du Portlandien de Canjuers (Sud-Est de la France). Annales du Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de Nice 1:9-40.
Ostrom JH 1978. T
he osteology of Compsognathus longipes. Zitteliana 4: 73–118.
Peyer K 2006.
A reconsideration of Compsognathus from the upper Tithonian of Canjuers, southeastern France, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 26:4, 879-896,
Wagner JA 1859. Über einige im lithographischen Schiefer neu aufgefundene Schildkröten und Saurier. Gelehrte Anzeigen der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften 49: 553.

wiki/Compsognathus