Beg tse: restoring missing neoceratopsian parts

Yu et al. 2020 bring us
a mostly complete and articulated 3D skull of a new neoceratopsian, Beg tse (Fig. 1; Mid- Cretaceous, Mongolia). Here some restoration, based on comparison to a phylogenetic sister Auroraceratops (Fig. 2), helps us understand the extent of the missing parts of this neoceratopsian.

Figure 1. Most of the skull of the new neoceratopsian, Beg tse. Colors added.

Figure 1. Most of the skull of the new neoceratopsian, Beg tse. Colors added.

Sereno 2005 defined Neoceratopsia as:
The most inclusive clade (Fig. 3) including Triceratops horridus, but not Psittacosaurus mongoliensis.

Figure 2. Beg tse nests with Auroraceratops in the LRT.

Figure 2. Beg tse nests with Auroraceratops in the LRT.

Yu et al. considered
Beg tse the most basal neoceratopsian currently known. That does not quite agree with the results recovered by the LRT (subset Fig. 3). Other taxa (Leptoceratops (Fig. 4), Auroraceratops) also nest in this node.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on Ornithischia with the addition of Beg tse.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on Ornithischia with the addition of Beg tse.

Figure 1. Leptoceratops in situ 2x. This taxon resolves the headless and head only node at the base of the ceratopsians in the LRT.

Figure 4. Leptoceratops in situ 2x. This taxon resolves the headless and head only node at the base of the ceratopsians in the LRT.

Since Stenopelix (Fig. 5) is almost quadrupedal,
phylogenetic bracketing indicates that Beg tse and Aurorceratops were likely bipeds, like Psittacosaurus (Fig. 5) and Leptoceratops (Fig. 4).

Figure 1. Stenopelix reconstructed in lateral and dorsal views to scale with Psittacosaurus. The curved ischium and short tail with short chevrons allies Stenopelix with ceratopsians.

Figure 5. Stenopelix reconstructed in lateral and dorsal views to scale with Psittacosaurus. The curved ischium and short tail with short chevrons allies Stenopelix with ceratopsians.

References
Yu C, Prieto-Marquez A, Chinzorig T, Badamkhatan Z and Norell M 2020. A neoceratopsian dinosaur from the early Cretaceous of Mongolia and the early evolution of ceratopsia. Nature Communications Biology 3:499 | https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-020-01222-7 http://www.nature.com/commsbio

wiki/Beg_tse

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.