Late-surviving sharovipterygids in Early Cretaceous Burmese amber

Earlier we looked at a
Oculudentavisa late-surviving cosesaur in Early Cretaceous Burmese amber. I noted it had just a few traits closer to another fenestrasaur, Sharovipteryx (Fig 2).

Figure 1. DGS tracings of two amber entombed Early Cretaceous sharovipterygids.

Figure 1. DGS tracings of two amber entombed Early Cretaceous sharovipterygids.

Today,
two unnumbered, unnamed, undescribed Early Cretaceous fenestrasaurs with even more sharovipterygid traits from the same Burmese amber. These specimens have huge eyes, a larger naris, a small antorbital fenestra, gracile postorbital bones, long cervicals with robust cervical ribs. That gray sickle-shaped area appears to represent the same sort of extendable hyoids seen in Sharovipteryx that extend the neck skin to form canard wing membranes or strakes (Fig. 2). Once again, these poor saps got their head stuck in the resin. The rest of the body was lost to the ages.

For comparison, a complete Sharovipteryx
(Fig. 2) is known from Late Triassic strata, coeval with the first pterosaurs, both derived from Cosesaurus, a lepidosaur tritosaur fenestrsaur.

Figure 3. Sharovipteryx reconstructed. Note the flattened torso.

Figure 3. Sharovipteryx reconstructed. Note the flattened torso.

References
No scale bar, No citation, No museum number, Owner unknown.

4 thoughts on “Late-surviving sharovipterygids in Early Cretaceous Burmese amber

    • I traced these from amber specimen photographs provided by a friend of another guy who took the pix halfway around the world. We’ll go back to numbered specimens after this rare exception.

  1. Thanks, I guessed that it was something like this. I hope getting this out makes it marginally more likely that the specimens will eventually be available for study. Assuming anyone is working on fossil lepidosaurs. Judging from Prof. Cau’s comments on Oculudentavis, there are a lot of ‘lepidosaurs’ in the Burmese amber. Presumably few workers on Mesozoic ‘lizards’ in general.

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