Late Jurassic pterosaur under UV light

Mike Eklund, Research Associate at the University of Texas,
is using black light (= uv light) to reveal what is ‘hidden in plain sight’ in fossils. At the HMNS.org blogsite a fully articulated and excellently preserved Late Jurassic pterosaur serves as only one of many subjects using this lighting technique (Figs. 1–3).

In case some controversial items are overlooked,
as they have been for centuries, I thought I’d highlight a few observations (Figs. 1-3).

Figure 1. Coloring the bones and membranes of this pterosaurs helps identify them here.

Figure 1. Coloring the bones and membranes of this pterosaurs helps identify them here.

For paleo-artists
note how the wing finger folds completely against the forearm. Note how the membrane virtually disappears when folded (Peters 2002, 2009), especially so at the wing tip. Also note that no part of the wing membrane ever extends to the tibia or ankle. This is evidence to counter myths perpetuated by prior pterosaur workers and artists.

Figure 2. Manual digit 5 on this pterosaur is undisturbed.

Figure 2. Manual digit 5 on this pterosaur is undisturbed.

Figure 3. Manual unguals on this pterosaur are undisturbed.

Figure 3. Manual unguals on this pterosaur are undisturbed.

This is not the first time
wing unguals and manual digit 5 have been identified in pterosaurs. Use those keywords to find previously posted specimens. Traditional paleontologists believe these bones don’t exist. That’s why I use Photoshop and the DGS technique… to share evidence. Now I encourage you to see for yourself.


References
Peters D 2002. A New Model for the Evolution of the Pterosaur Wing – with a twist. – Historical Biology 15: 277–301.
Peters D 2009. A reinterpretation of pteroid articulation in pterosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 29:1327-1330.

https://blog.hmns.org/2020/01/hidden-in-plain-sight-how-photography-techniques-are-helping-us-dig-deeper/

 

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