Pseudictops: what little we know is unique

There are not many mammals with crenulated/serrated teeth.
Pseudictops lophiodon (Matthews, Granger and Simpson 1929, Sulimski 1968, Late Paleocene, 57 mya; Fig. 1; AMNH 21727) is one such mammal. From the start Pseudictops was compared to anagalids like Leptictis (Fig. 2), a basal elephant shrew and ancestor to tenrecs, pakicetids and odontocete whales.

Figure 1. Pseudictops lophiodon compared to the slightly larger Siamotherium.

Figure 1. Pseudictops lophiodon compared to the slightly larger Siamotherium. The mandible is extremely robust and appears to nearly lack a coronoid process, distinct from most mammals.Note the crenulations and and/or robust serrations on the anterior teeth.

Figure 1a. Pseudictops anterior teeth.

Figure 1a. Pseudictops anterior teeth.

The dentary incisors
are deeply rooted in a deep dentary. Not sure why the two dentaries (Fig. 1) have distinct shapes. Perhaps they are not actually related to one another or perhaps some parts are missing from the smaller one and plasterered over.

Figure 2. Leptictis, an early Oligocene elephant shrew.

Figure 2. Leptictis, an early Oligocene elephant shrew.

Now that you’ve met Pseudictops, a quick look at Ictops
reveals a cranium with a double parasagittal crest, as in sister taxon, Leptictis

Figure 6. Rhynchocyon (above) and Macroscelides (below) compared. Though both are considered elephant shrews, they nest in separate major mammal clades in the LRT.

Figure 3. Rhynchocyon (above) and Macroscelides (below) compared. Though both are considered elephant shrews, they nest in separate major mammal clades in the LRT.


References
Matthew WD, Granger W and Simpson GG 1929. Additiions to the fauna of the Gashato Formatin of Mongolia. American Museum Novitates 376:1–12.
Sulimski A 1968. Paleocene genus Pseudictops Matthew, Granger and Simpson 1929 (Mammalia) and its revision. www.palaeontologia.pan.pl/Archive/1968-19–1011-129–10-14.pdf

 

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