A paper model of the ‘Discodactylus’ skull

Earlier a flat, but layered Adobe Photoshop plan of the skull of Discodactylus’ was presented (Fig. 1) and nested with the very similar anurognathid pterosaur, Vesperopterylus.

Figure 3. The skull of NJU-57003 reconstructed in animated layers for clarity. This is something the print media just cannot do as well. All elements are similar to those found earlier in other anurognathids.

Figure 1. The skull of NJU-57003 reconstructed in animated layers for clarity. This is something the print media just cannot do as well. All elements are similar to those found earlier in other anurognathids.

Here
a paper, paste and tape model of this plan is presented (Figs. 2, 3), made from a print out of the elements in figure 1.

Figure 1. Paper reconstruction of the Discodactylus skull and mandibles.

Figure 2. Paper reconstruction of the Discodactylus skull and mandibles. Yes, the dentary teeth don’t make sense. They are scattered in situ and this is not corrected here.

The extremely fragile skull
held together from below by slender palatal bones (maxillary palatal rods and hyoids not shown) provides a solution for a flying animal with a wide, rattlesnake-like gape.

Figure 3. Another view of the paper reconstruction of the skull and mandibles of Discodactylus.

Figure 3. Another view of the paper reconstruction of the skull and mandibles of Discodactylus.

Discodactylus megasterna (Yang et al. 2018; Middle-Late Jurassic; NJU-57003) is a complete skeleton of a disc-skull anurognathid with soft tissue related to Vesperopterylus (below). The sternal complex is quite large to match the wider than tall torso. Distinct from other anurognathids, m4.1 does not reach the elbow when folded.

This specimen was featured in a report (Yang et al. 2018) on pterosaur filaments that incorrectly aligned pterosaurs with feathered dinosaurs, rather than their true ancestors, the filamentous fenestrasaurs, Sharovipteryx and Longisquama.

Figure 4. Vesperopterylus skull reconstructed from color data traced in figure 3.

Figure 4. Vesperopterylus skull reconstructed 

Figure 2. Vesperopterylus reconstructed using original drawings which were originally traced from the photo. Manual digit 4.4 is buried beneath other bones and reemerges to give its length. Pedal digit 1 turns laterally due to metacarpal arcing and taphonomic crushing. There is nothing reversed about it. 

Figure 5. Vesperopterylus reconstructed using original drawings which were originally traced from the photo. Manual digit 4.4 is buried beneath other bones and reemerges to give its length. Pedal digit 1 turns laterally due to metacarpal arcing and taphonomic crushing. There is nothing reversed about it.

References
Yang et al. (8 co-authors) 2018. Pterosaur integumentary structures with complex feather-like branching. Nature ecology & evolution.

 

 

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