The short-faced bear (Arctodus) is a giant wolverine in the LRT.

Yesterday we looked at three bears, Ursus, Arctodus (Fig. 1) and Ailuropoda (the polar bear, the short-faced bear and the panda bear). They do not form a single bear clade in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1299 taxa), but each is more closely related to small weasels and grew to bear-size by convergence.

For instance,
Arctodus is most closely related to today’s wolverine (Gulo gulo, Figs. 1, 2) among tested taxa, and the similarities are immediately apparent. Have they ever been tested together before? Let me know if this is so.

Figure 1. Arctodus (shor-faced bear) skeleton compared to the smaller Gulo (wolverine) skeleton. Both have similar proportions. Arctodus is larger than 3m, while Gulo is about 1m in length.

Figure 1. Arctodus (shor-faced bear) skeleton compared to the smaller Gulo (wolverine) skeleton. Both have similar proportions. Arctodus is larger than 3m, while Gulo is about 1m in length.

Arctodus simus (Leidy 1854; Cope 1874; up to 3 to 3.7m tall) is the extinct short-faced bear, one of the largest terrestrial mammalian carnivores of all time. Long limbs made it a fast predator. Being related to the wolverine made it short-tempered and dangerous.

Figure 2. Long-legged Gulo, the wolverine, is most similar to Arctodus, the short-faced bear in the LRT.

Figure 2. Long-legged Gulo, the wolverine, is most similar to Arctodus, the short-faced bear in the LRT. That’s a penile bone, not a prepubis.

Gulo gulo (Linneaus 1758; up to 110 cm in length) is the extant wolverine, a ferocious predator resembling a small bear. Note the tail length is midway between the long tail of weasels and the short tail of birds.

Figure 1. Subset of the LRT focusing on the Carnivora with tan tones on the bears newly added.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on the Carnivora with tan tones on the bears newly added.

The red panda
(Ailurus) was also added to the LRT (Fig. 3) and, to no one’s surprise, nests with the raccoon, Procyon apart from the giant panda.

Figure 4. Gulo skull in lateral and dorsal views. Compare to Arctodus in figure 5.

Figure 4. Gulo skull in lateral and dorsal views. Compare to Arctodus in figure 5. The male skull has the larger and longer parasagittal crest.

The skulls of Gulo and Arctodus
(Figs. 4, 5) despite their size differences, are quite similar. Both display sexual dimorphism.

Figure 5. Arctodus (short-faced bear) skull in lateral view. Compare to figure 4.

Figure 5. Arctodus (short-faced bear) skull in lateral view. Compare to figure 4.

Taxon inclusion
sheds light on phylogenetic interrelationships.

If you have an interest in wolverine evolution,
I suggest you use the keyword “Gulo” or you’ll end up learning about Marvel’s superhero, also named Wolverine.

References
Cope ED 1879. The cave bear of California. American Naturalist 13:791.
Leidy 1854. Remarks on Sus americanus or Harlanus americanus, and on other extinct mammals. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 7:90.
Linnaeus C 1758. Systema naturæ per regna tria naturæ, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata.

wiki/Gulo
wiki/Short-faced_bear

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