The last common ancestor of all dinosaurs in the LRT: ?Buriolestes

Müller et al. 2018
describe a new dinosaur skeleton they attribute to Buriolestes shultzi (Cabreria et al. 2016, ULBRA-PVT280, Figs. 2, 3). In the large reptile tree (LRT, 2015 taxa; subset Fig. 1) the holotype now nests at the base of the Phytodinosauria. The referred specimen is different enough to nest between the herrerasaurs and all other dinosaurs. This, of course, removes herrerasaurs from the definition of the Dinosauria (Passer + Triceratops, their last common ancestor (= CAPPA/UFSM 0035) and all descendants).

Figure 1. Subset of the LRT including the new specimen of Buriolestes (CAPPA/UFSM 0035) nesting at the base of all dinosaurs.

Figure 1. Subset of the LRT including the new specimen of Buriolestes (CAPPA/UFSM 0035) nesting at the base of all dinosaurs.

 

Buriolestes schultzi (Cabreria et al. 2016; Late Triassic, Carnian; 230mya) was originally and later (Müller et al. 2018) considered a carnivorous sauropodomorph, but here two specimens nest as the basalmost dinosaur (CAPPA/UFSM 0035) and the basalmost phytodinosaur (ULBRA-PVT280).

Figure 2. The two skulls attributed to Buriolestes (holotype on the right). The one on the left nests as the basalmost dinosaur, basal to theropods and phytodinosaurs.

Figure 2. The two skulls attributed to Buriolestes (holotype on the right). The one on the left nests as the basalmost dinosaur, basal to theropods and phytodinosaurs. It should have a distinct name.

All cladograms agree that Buriolestes
is a very basal dinosaur. Taxon exclusion changes the tree topology of competing cladograms. The broad autapomorphic ‘eyebrow’ of the CAPPA specimen indicates it is a derived trait in this Late Triassic representative of an earlier genesis.

Figure 3. Herrerasaurus, Buriolestes and Tawa to scale.

Figure 3. Herrerasaurus, Buriolestes and Tawa to scale.

The Müller et al. cladogram
combined both specimens attributed to Buriolestes (never a good idea, but it happens all the time). The Müller et al. cladogram excluded a long list of basal bipedal crocodylomorpha, but did include Lewisuchus. It excluded the archosaur outgroups PVL 4597Turfanosuchus and Decuriasuchus. The Müller et al. cladogram nested Ornithischia basal to Saurischia (= Herrerasauridae + Agnophitys, Eodromaeus, Daemonosaurus + Theropoda + Sauropodomorpha) with Buriolestes nesting between Eoraptor and Panphagia. The CAPPA specimen of Buriolestes is also a sister to the basalmost theropod, Tawa (Fig. 3)… and not far from the other basal archosaur, Junggarsuchus (Fig. 4).

Figure 8. The CAPPA specimen of Buriolestes compared to the more primitive Junggarsuchus, basal to the other branch of archosaurs, the crocs.

Figure 4. The CAPPA specimen of Buriolestes compared to Junggarsuchus, basal to the other branch of archosaurs, the crocs.

References
Cabreira SF et al. (13 co-authors) 2016. A unique Late Triassic dinosauromorph assemblage reveals dinosaur ancestral anatomy and diet. Current Biology (2016), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.09.040
Müller RT et al. (5 co-authors 2018. Early evolution of sauropodomorphs: anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of a remarkably well-preserved dinosaur from the Upper Triassic of southern Brazil. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, zly009 (advance online publication) doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/zoolinnean/zly009

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2 thoughts on “The last common ancestor of all dinosaurs in the LRT: ?Buriolestes

  1. Directly from the manuscript: “Firstly, it was simply scored in the data matrix by Cabreira et al. (2016), in order to test its taxonomic assignment to B. schultzi. In order to do so, CAPPA/UFSM 0035 and ULBRA-PVT280 (the holotype of B. schultzi) were coded as TWO DISTINCT operational
    taxonomic units (OTUs).” After that, and considering the anatomical features of the specimens, the authors conducted the others phylogenetic analysis with both specimens combined. In other words, the authors did not simply combined the specimens. There was a “control analysis”.

    I’ve missed, on your post a “deeper look”, of the anatomical differences that nested the specimens that way in the LRT.

    • Thank you for the clarification. I can send the .nex file to you if you’re interested in the traits. One of the keys to understanding basal most dinosaurs is to include basal most non-dinosaur archosaurs. That’s a short list of bipedal crocs missing from the published study.

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