4 nostrils in Chamaeleo?

The skull of the smooth chameleon,
Chamaeleo laevigatus (Figs. 1, 2), has two extra holes in the anterodorsal plane of its rostrum (Fig. 1). Despite appearances, the holes visible in top view are not nostrils.

Figure 1. The chameleon Trioceros jacksonii colored using DGS. The sutures are difficult to see in the original skull, much easier in the colorized tracing.

Figure 1. The chameleons Chamaeleo and Trioceros. Note the lateral nostrils on both taxa. Chamaeleo has two more openings in dorsal view.  Not sure if Trioceros was the same. Note the giant pterygoids on Chamaeleo. The prefrontal and postfrontal are in contact. The premaxilla is tiny in ventral view.

The Chamaeleo rostrum
is angled at about 50º from the jawline. Given just the skull, you might think those openings in dorsal view are nostrils. With skin and scales on (Fig. 2), the nostrils are located on the lateral plane, as in other chameleons, like Trioceros (Fig. 1), surrounded by traditional circumnarial bones.

Figure 2. Chamaeleo laevigatus invivo. Red arrow points to external naris.

Figure 2. Chamaeleo laevigatus invivo. Red arrow points to external naris.

Diaz and Trainer 2015 published
some nice images of chameleon hands and feet, colorized here (Fig. 3) for additional clarity. The metacarpals and metatarsals are the bones that radiate. The phalanges are all vertical here.

Figure 3. The manus and pes skeleton of a chameleon from Diaz et al. 2016 with colors added and the second from left image relabels the fingers, correcting a typo.

Figure 3. The manus and pes skeleton of a chameleon from Diaz et al. 2015 with colors added and the second from left image relabels the fingers, correcting a typo. Manual 1 has only two phalanges. The metacarpals and metatarsals open horizontally in these images. Note the ankle elements are not co-ossified.

References
Diaz RE Jr. and Trainor PA 2015. Hand/foot splitting and the ‘re-evolution’ of mesopodial skeletal elements during the evolution and radiation of chameleons. BMC Evolutionary Biology201513:184.

wiki/Smooth_chameleon
digimorph.org/Chamaeleo_laevigatus/
Chamaeleo laevigatus GRAY, 1863″. The Reptile Database

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