Early Cretaceous stem chameleon/horned lizard

Unnamed stem chameleon (Daza et al. 2016; Early Cretaceous, 1.2cm in length; JZC Bu154; Fig. 1) is a tiny neonate preserved in amber. It also nests basal to horned lizards like Phrynosoma, in the large reptile tree (LRT, 1089 taxa). Note the long, straight hyoid forming the base of the shooting tongue. The split fingers and toes of extant chameleons had not yet developed in this taxon. Found in amber, this newborn lived in a coniferous forest.

Figure 1. The Early Cretaceous stem chameleon/horned lizard found amber. Snout to vent length is less than 11 mm. Much smaller than a human thumbnail.

Figure 1. The Early Cretaceous stem chameleon/horned lizard found amber. Snout to vent length is less than 11 mm. Much smaller than a human thumbnail. Insitu fossil from Daza et al. 2016,  colorized and reconstructed here. At a standard 72 dpi screen resolution, this specimen is shown 10x actual size.

This specimen further cements
the interrelationship of arboreal chameleons and their terrestrial sisters, the horned lizard we looked at earlier with Trioceros and Phyrnosoma in blue of this cladogram (Fig. 2) subset of the LRT.

Figure 3. Subset of the LRT focusing on the neonate stem chameleon/horned lizard.

Figure 2. Subset of the LRT focusing on the neonate stem chameleon/horned lizard.

Figure 6. Phyronosoma, the horned lizard of North America.

Figure 3. Phyronosoma, the horned lizard of North America.

Figure 2. Trioceros jacksonii overall. Size is 12 inches (30 cm) from tip to tip.

Figure 4. Trioceros jacksonii overall. Size is 12 inches (30 cm) from tip to tip.

References
Daza JD et al. 2016. Mid-Cretaceous amber fossils illuminate the past diversity of tropical lizards. Sci. Adv. 2016; 2 : e1501080 4 March 2016

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