A deeper extension for the Lepidosauria

By definition
the Lepidosauria includes Rhynchocelphalia (Sphenodon), Squamata (Iguana), their last common ancestor and all descendants. By this definition pterosaurs and kin are lepidosaurs because they nest between rhychocephalians and iguanids in a traditionally unrecognized clade the Tritosauria (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Subset of the LRT focusing on the Lepidosauria. Now the drepanosaur clade lumps with the rhynchocephalians in the crown group. Extant lepidosaurs are in gray.

Figure 1. Subset of the LRT focusing on the Lepidosauria. Now the drepanosaur clade lumps with the rhynchocephalians in the crown group. Extant lepidosaurs are in gray.

While reviewing
the large reptile tree (LRT, 1087 taxa, subset Fig. 1) following the addition of Avicranium, the base of the Rhynchocephalia  shifted back to include Jesairosaurus, and the drepanosaursSaurosternon and Palaegama, which formerly nested as outgroup Lepidosauriformes now nest basal to the tritosaurs, pro-squamates and squamates within the Lepidosauria, based on the traditional definition.

With this change
the non-lepidosaur Lepidosauriformes are reduced to just the glider clade, Coletta, Paliguana, and Sophineta, taxa with a diapsid skull architecture. These remain stem lepidosaurs. The membership of the clade Lepidosauriformes do not change.

Remember,
despite their diapsid temporal morphology, these are not members of the clade Diapsida, which is restricted to Archosauromorph ‘diapsids’ only. Petrolacosaurus is a basal member of the monophyletic Diapsida. The clade name ‘Lepidosauriformes’ includes all lepidosauromorphs with upper and lateral temporal fenestrae. If you know any traditional paleontologists who still think lepidosaurs are related to archosaurs, please show them the LRT.

Once a definition for a clade is made
then the next step is to see which taxa fall under than definition… and then to see if that definition is a junior synonym for a previously published definition based on clade membership. Remember, traditional traits may not give you monophyly, but phylogenetic analysis always will.

And
yes, I do review all the scores in the LRT and announce updates when they are made.

 

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