I was looking for a long-legged crow…

But I only found a grackle.

Then I started looking
for a long-legged crow/grackle for the large reptile tree (LRT, 1151 taxa), because basal Euornithes are all long-legged, terrestrial birds. Grackles/crows were short-legged exceptions that needed a long-legged ancestor.

Figure 1. Oedicnemus longirostris (= Burhinus oedicnemus?) the long-sough long-legged crow/grackle, the Eurasian stone curlew or thick knee.

Figure 1. Oedicnemus longirostris (= Burhinus oedicnemus?) the long-sough long-legged crow/grackle, the Eurasian stone curlew or thick knee.

I finally found one.
It’s the Eurasian stone curlew (Burhinus oedicnemius) aka? thick-knee (maybe previously known as: Oedicnemius longirostris, Fig. 1).

Oedicnemus longirostris (aka?: Burhinus oedicnemus Linneaus 1758) is the extant Eurasian stone curlew or thick-knee. Length: up to 46cm. Large yellow bulging eyes are adaptations to nocturnal hunting of small tetrapods and invertebrates. Long legs and a terrestrial lifestyle are primitive for all neognath, euornithine birds. This taxon is derived from a sister to Ciconia and basal to grackles, like Quiscalus (below) as well as the Aramus and Threskiornis clades. Note the tiny pedal digit 1.

I was also looking for a megapode.
Any megapode. Could not find skeletal material on the Internet. The good folks at the Smithsonian sent me some bits and pieces. That solves yet another phylogenetic problem.

References
Linnaeus C 1758. Systema naturæ per regna tria naturæ, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. Tomus I. Editio decima, reformata.

wiki/Common_grackle
wiki/Corvus
wiki/Blue_jay
wiki/Eurasian_stone-curlew

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