Glide analysis in hatchling pterosaurs

Witton et al. 2017 report in their abstract:
We found that hatchling pterosaurs were excellent gliders, but with a wing ecomorphology more comparable to powered fliers than obligate gliders.”

Since hatchling pterosaurs were scale models of adults,
and adults were powered fliers, the logic follows. Oddly, Witton wrote a book in which this was not the case when he imagined a pre-hatchling Pterodaustro with a short rostrum and big eyes.

Witton et al. 2017 continue:
“Size differences between pterosaur hatchlings and larger members of their species dictate differences in wing ecomorphology and flight capabilities at different life stages, which might have bearing on pterosaur ontogenetic niching.”

Big science words here say nothing concrete. 
Dictate different flight capabilities: no. Dictate different prey items: yes.  Note the weasel word: “might have bearing” which acts like a nail in a tire to deflate everything said after it. Try to avoid using weasel words.

References
Witton M, Martin-Silverstone E and Naish D 2017. Glide analysis and bone strength tests indicate powered flight capabilities in hatchling pterosaurs. https://peerj.com/preprints/3216/

2 thoughts on “Glide analysis in hatchling pterosaurs

  1. … and Darren turns a word choice into a personal insult. I’ve lived long enough to know when someone throws an insult that’s, ironically, how they feel about themselves. That’s something I taught my kids and, surprisingly, it’s often true. Apply yourself, Darren, and you will get back on track.

    PS. Try “the evidence shows” as an alternative. Works better than “maybe” “might” and “could possibly”.

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