Vesperopterylus (aka: Versperopterylus, Lü et al. 2017) did not have a reversed first toe

And this specimen PROVES again
that anurognathids DID NOT have giant eyeballs in the anterior skull.

Figure 1. Vesperopterylus in situ. There is nothing distinct about pedal digit 1.

Figure 1. Vesperopterylus in situ. There is nothing distinct about pedal digit 1.

Lü et al. 2017 bring us a new little wide-skull anurognathid
Vesperopterylus lamadongensis (Lü et al. 2017) is a complete skeleton of a wide-skull anurognathid. It was considered the first pterosaur with a reversed first toe based on the fact that in digit 1 the palmar surface of the ungual is oriented lateral while digis 2–4 the palmar surfaces of the unguals are medial. That is based on the slight transverse curve of the metatarsus (Peters 2000) and the crushing which always lays unguals on their side. In life the palmar surfaces were all ventral and digit 1 radiated anteriorly along with the others.

Figure 2. Vesperopterylus reconstructed using original drawings which were originally traced from the photo. Manual digit 4.4 is buried beneath other bones and reemerges to give its length. Pedal digit 1 turns laterally due to metacarpal arcing and taphonomic crushing. There is nothing reversed about it. 

Figure 2. Vesperopterylus reconstructed using original drawings which were originally traced from the photo. Manual digit 4.4 is buried beneath other bones and reemerges to give its length. Pedal digit 1 turns laterally due to metacarpal arcing and taphonomic crushing. There is nothing reversed about it.

Lü et al were unable to segregate the skull bones.
Those are segregated by color here using DGS (Digital Graphic Segregation). See below. Some soft tissue is preserved on the wing. Note: I did not see the fossil first hand, yet I was able to discern the skull bones that evidently baffled those who had this specimen under a binocular microscope. Perhaps they were looking for the giant sclerotic rings in the anterior skull that are not present. Little ones, yes. Big ones, no.

Figure 1. Vesperopterylus skull with bones identified by DGS (digital graphic segregation). Lü et al. were not able to discern these bones and so left the area blank in their tracing. Note the complete lack of a giant eyeball in the front of the skull. Radius and ulna were removed for clarity and to show a complete lack of giant eyeballs (sclerotic rings) in the anterior skull. 

Figure 1. Vesperopterylus skull with bones identified by DGS (digital graphic segregation). Lü et al. were not able to discern these bones and so left the area blank in their tracing. Note the complete lack of a giant eyeball in the front of the skull. Radius and ulna were removed for clarity and to show a complete lack of giant eyeballs (sclerotic rings) in the anterior skull.

This skull reconstruction
(Fig. 4) is typical of every other anurognathid, because guesswork has been minimized here. After doing this several times with other anurognathids, I knew what to look for and found it. No giant sclerotic rings were seen in this specimen.

Figure 4. Vesperopterylus skull reconstructed from color data traced in figure 3.

Figure 4. Vesperopterylus skull reconstructed from color data traced in figure 3. Due to the angled sides of the skull some foreshortening was employed  to match those angles. Original sizes are also shown.

With regard to perching
all basal pterosaurs could perch on branches of a wide variety of diameters by flexing digit 1–4 while extending digit 5, acting like a universal wrench (Peters 2000, FIg. 5). This ability has been overlooked by other workers for the last two decades,

Figure 1. The pterosaur Dorygnathus perching on a branch. Above the pes of Dorygnathus demonstrating the use of pedal digit 5 as a universal wrench (left), extending while the other four toes flexed around a branch of any diameter and (right) flexing with the other four toes. As in birds, perching requires bipedal balancing because the medially directed fingers have nothing to grasp.

Figure 1. The pterosaur Dorygnathus perching on a branch. Above the pes of Dorygnathus demonstrating the use of pedal digit 5 as a universal wrench (left), extending while the other four toes flexed around a branch of any diameter and (right) flexing with the other four toes. As in birds, perching requires bipedal balancing because the medially directed fingers have nothing to grasp.

I have not yet added Vesperopterylus
to the large pterosaur tree.

References
Lü J-C et al. 2017. Short note on a new anurognathid pterosaur with evidence of perching behaviour from Jianchang of Liaoning Province, China. From: Hone, D. W. E., Witton MP and Martill DM(eds) New Perspectives on Pterosaur Palaeobiology.
Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 455, https://doi.org/10.1144/SP455.16
Peters D 2000. Description and Interpretation of Interphalangeal Lines in Tetrapods. 
Ichnos, 7: 11-41

 

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