Dinosaur books

At one time
I wanted to write and illustrate a dinosaur book. I had an idea for one (Fig. 1) and was inspired by the writers and artists of the Dinosaur Renaissance. It took several years…

Figure 1. The cover of Giants, the book that launched my adult interest in dinosaurs, pterosaurs and everything inbetween.

Figure 1. The cover of Giants, the book that launched my adult interest in dinosaurs, pterosaurs and everything inbetween.

Then
I got a contract to do my first book. That begat another and another. The shelf life was no more than one year for any of them. None went to second editions, though several had foreign versions. Reviews were good. Libraries stocked them. Book signings were fun, when there was advanced publicity. Every so often there was a big or small check in the mail. Now Amazon keeps them alive, if just barely. Reviews are still good…

Nowadays
I would not want to write and illustrate another dinosaur book. New discoveries make at least part of the text and part of the depiction of its subjects obsolete, sometimes before shelf life is over. The amount of data needed to be covered is staggering. More pages mean the price the book rises out of the ability to pay for many potential readers. With book publication, there are no ‘do-overs’ or ‘updates.’ What’s done is done. And then there are always the nagging typos. There’s a lot of work involved. And it has to be polished perfect. Editors, working for publishers, have their say. So do collaborators, if any. You have to put your life on hold to get the thing done by deadline. And when it’s done, it sits on a bookstore shelf, just one more Christmas or birthday present vying for the consumer’s eye.

It’s much better to post blogs
and nurture growing websites, like ReptileEvolution.com. These can be updated at will in one’s spare time. There are no paper or printing costs. No ships and trucks to distribute them. No bookstores to deal with. No deadlines. News can be reviewed within a day, while it’s still fresh. Everyone in the world has free access to your work. They can focus in on what they really like and ignore the rest at no cost. And one more thing (quoting Steve Jobs) that books can’t provide: animation. There’s no profit in web publishing, but money was never the front and center issue.

Figure 2. Sample animation you’ll never see in a book. The Vienna specimen of Pterodactylus (wings folded). Animation opens the wings and legs to reveal the true shape of pterosaur wings, stretched between the elbow and wingtip with a short fuselage fillet extending from elbow to mid femur.

Even so
I’m glad I went through that book phase. It had its time and place. The process led me to interact with others of like interest. Some of them are PhDs. Others are fellow artists and writers. Everyone should have a hobby to keep in touch with the world and vice versa.

I was inspired to write this blog post
after seeing parts of Walking with Dinosaurs 3D on YouTube. Click here to see it. So much talent and effort went into this— truly outstanding visuals …but the dialog was horrible, as most others agree. And there are a few new dinosaur books out now, updating older dino books. I wish them all well. Someday, perhaps decades from now, those books will either be considered cherished classics or outdated, ready to be updated. It’s all good.

References
www.DavidPetersStudio.com/books
www.ReptileEvolution.com

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One thought on “Dinosaur books

  1. I have got hooked on most of my interests by browsing the bookshelves in local bookshops. A title or a jacket illustration will catch my eye and I will buy a book just out of sheer curiosity. That’s how I came across Pterosaurs by a chance glimpse of Peter Wellnhofer’s Encyclopaedia of Pterosaurs. I have now studied them for many years thanks to that book. Just an observation on the use of printed books!

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