Oops! What’s wrong with this picture?

So far you’ve learned so much about the skeletons of vertebrates. Now, can you tell what is wrong with the published image below? It will be obvious once you know what to look for. Scroll down for the solution.

Figure 1. Can you tell what is wrong with this picture of a museum mount of Ernanodon published in Vickers-Rich and Rich 1993?

Figure 1. Can you tell what is wrong with this picture of a museum mount of Ernanodon published in Vickers-Rich and Rich 1993?

Earlier we looked at and nested the basal marsupial, Ernanodon (Figs. 1, 2). The museum mount published in Vickers-Rich and Rich 1993, has one glaring error. Can you spot it?

Ernanodon anteilos (Ting [Ding] 1979; Paleocene; 50 cm in length) was originally considered placental mammal, perhaps a primitive anteater, then regarded as a primitive pangolin, like Manis. Here Ernanodon nests with Hyaenodon and Deltatheridum as a creodont marsupial, sharing large canines with both.

The skull was robust with a jaw joint nearly as far back as the occiput. The claws were broad and long, ideal for digging. The tail was long, but very slender.

Figure 2. Here is the same museum mount repaired in Photoshop. The pelvis was originally installed backwards. Here the pelvis is correctly mounted.

Figure 2. Here is the same museum mount repaired in Photoshop. The pelvis was originally installed backwards. Here the pelvis is correctly mounted.

Answer
The pelvis of the museum mount was installed backwards. Here (Fig. 2) the pelvis has been flipped in Photoshop to its correct position.

References
Ding SY 1979. A new edentate from the Paleocene of Guangdong. Vertebrata PalAsiatica 17:57–64. [Chinese 57–61; English 62–64].
Vickers-Rich P and Rich TH 1993. Wildlife of Gondwana. REED, Chatswood, Australia. 276 pp.

wiki/Ernanodon

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