The Archosauria according to the U of Maryland website

The University of Maryland website on the Rise of the Dinosauria includes the following cladogram (Fig. 1) which pretty much follows paleo traditions. Note the proximal position of pterosaurs to ‘Dinosauromorpha’ and the distant position of crocodylomorphs, which makes room for many intervening taxa to be considered archosaurs (= birds + crocs).

Figure 1. The Archosauria according to the University of Maryland. Here pterosaurs are close to dinosaurs.

Figure 1. The Archosauria according to the University of Maryland. Here pterosaurs are close to dinosaurs. Click to enlarge.

By contrast
in the large reptile tree, pterosaurs nest far from dinosaurs and crocs nest alongside them. So there are no intervening taxa between dinosaurs and crocs (Fig. 2). And there are no odd nesting partners here, like pterosaurs nesting with taxa with small hands and tiny fingers and no toe 5, etc. etc

Figure 2. Same cladogram rearranged to more closely match the large reptile tree. Note how, even at this scale, the gradual evolution of dinosaur traits is not interrupted by the odd morphology of pterosaurs. And how the basal bipedal crocs nest close to the basal bipedal dinos. Click to enlarge. 

Figure 2. Same cladogram rearranged to more closely match the large reptile tree. Note how, even at this scale, the gradual evolution of dinosaur traits is not interrupted by the odd morphology of pterosaurs. And how the basal bipedal crocs nest close to the basal bipedal dinos. This tree is missing SO many taxa, it puts the reader into the position of having to believe the relationships, not observe them. Click to enlarge.

There is a clinging to tradition at the U of Maryland
that needs to be revisited. If students need to regurgitate these antiquated hypotheses in order to get a good grade, then what does that teach them at the university level?

Take a look at those key traits (in red) above (Fig. 1).

  1. Elongate pubes and ischia: also found in basal bipedal crocs and prodinosaurs, like the PVL 4597 specimen. Also in poposaurs, like Poposaurus an Turfanosuchus.
  2. Parasagittal stance and hinge-like ankle joint: also found basal bipedal crocs, like Scleromochlus and Terrestrisuchus. Sure pterosaurs have such a stance and ankle, but so do fenestrasaurs (tritosaur lepidosaurs) like Sharovipteryx.
  3. Ellongate tibiae and metatarsi; loss of bony armor: again, basal bipedal crocs and fenestrasaurs.
  4. The lower traits are synapomorphies.

Students,
put your thinking caps on. Ask the hard questions. Do the experiments yourself. This is Science. Don’t be satisfied with answers that don’t make sense and can’t be validated up and down the entire cladogram.

The large reptile tree does not use suprageneric taxa, as shown above. Only species- and specimen-based taxa are included there. All taxa demonstrate a gradual accumulation of derived traits. All subsets retain the tree topology. The tree has grown from 200+ taxa to 674 taxa with the same 228 characters lumping and splitting them to full resolution.

Plus pterosaurs and plus basal therapsids drive this taxon list into the 900s.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “The Archosauria according to the U of Maryland website

  1. Can you tell me what is your CI, RI and branch support in bremer, boostrap and jacknife of your “supertree”? (or probabilities if you use bayesian methods). Because not only a bunch of characters and OTUs make a good topology.

    • Homology Index (HI) is extremely high here because of all the homology in the inclusion set. Thus CI is low. See http://www.reptileevolution.com/reptile-tree.htm for jackknife bootstrap values, which generally are over 50 when taxa (including clades) are separated from one another by at least three traits, as the vast majority are. Smaller subsets, of course, have higher CI values and higher character/taxon ratios because they often do not include clades with homologous traits. Currently there are 680 taxa lumped and separated by 228 traits, some with multi-state scores. A good topology is when you can trace or demonstrate the gradual accumulation of traits of all derived taxa – and virtually all possible candidates are included for a high confidence factor (HCF) such that “no stone has been left unturned.” That’s the value of a large gamut taxon list.

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