Maybe Anomocephalus had canine fangs, too!

Two dicynodont-mimics,
Tiarajudens (UFRGS PV393P, Cisneros et al. 2011) and Anomocephalus (Modesto et al. 1999) were discovered in the last few two decades. Tiarajudens had sharp teeth and a fang/canine/tusk. Anomocephalus had flat teeth and apparently no tusk (Fig. 1).

Working from the published tracing
I put the scattered teeth of Anomocephalus back into the jaws and discovered that maybe there is a tusk/fang in there, too (Fig. 1). If valid, the fang was broken in half during typhonomy, so it became the same length as the other teeth, all of which had narrow roots, unlike the fang.

Figure 1. Anomocephalus in situ and reconstructed. Apparently a fang/canine/tusk was hiding among the broken teeth.

Figure 1. Anomocephalus in situ and reconstructed. In situ image from Modesto et al. 199. Apparently a fang/canine/tusk was hiding among the broken teeth.

Tiarajudens and Anomocephalus
are considered middle Permian primitive herbivorous anomodonts by the author(s) of Wikipedia, who also suggest they were ancestral to dicynodonts. By contrast, the large reptile tree (Fig. 2)  nests Tiarajudens and Anomocephalus in a clade close to, but separate from dicynodonts (Fig. 2).

Figure 3. Basal therapsid tree.

Figure 3. Basal therapsid tree. Note the nesting of the Anomodontia and the dicynodonts here, both derived from smaller dromasaurs.

According to the LRT, the ancestors of dicynodont mimics were 
Venjukovia and Otsheria. The ancestors of dicynodonts include Suminia, a late-survivor of an early radiation. Both were derived from smaller dromasaurs (Fig. 3).

Figure 3. Venjukoviamorphs include the dicynodont mimics, Tiarajudens and Anomcephalus. now with long canines.

Figure 3. Venjukoviamorphs include the dicynodont mimics, Tiarajudens and Anomcephalus, the latter now with mid-length canines. The Anomocephalus drawing is modified from Modesto et al. 1999 and appears to have certain problems.

References
Cisneros, JC, Abdala F, Rubidge BS, Dentzien-Dias D and Bueno AO 2011. Dental Occlusion in a 260-Million-Year-Old Therapsid with Saber Canines from the Permian of Brazi”. Science 331: 1603–1605.
Modesto S, Rubidge B and Welman J 1999. The most basal anomodont therapsid and the primacy of Gondwana in the evolution of the anomodonts. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 266: 331–337. PMC 1689688.

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