Omnivoropteryx reconstructed and nested

A recent addition
Omnivoropteryx sinousaorum (Czerkas & Ji 2002, Fig. 1) now nests in the large reptile tree as a sister to Epidexipteryx (Fig. 4), a derived scansoropterygid bird.

Figure 1. Omnivoropteryx reconstructed from an X-ray photograph.

Figure 1. Omnivoropteryx reconstructed from X-ray photographs (Figs. 2, 3) Some workers think this bird looks like an oviraptorid. I think it looks like an anurognathid.

From the Wikipedia article
“Omnivoropteryx
 (meaning “omnivorous wing”) is a genus of primitive flying bird from the early Cretaceous Upper Jiufotang Formation of China.

Figure 2. The Omnivoropteryx skull X-ray with DGS color tracings. These were used to reconstruct the skull in lateral view.

Figure 2. The Omnivoropteryx skull X-ray with DGS color tracings. These were used to reconstruct the skull in lateral view.

“The authors
who described Omnivoropteryx, Stephen Czerkas and Qiang Ji, stated that their specimen closely resembles Sapeornis (Fig. 5), but the pubis was longer and, since no skull was known for Sapeornis, they did not consider the two names synonyms. The later discovery of Sapeornis skulls shows that they were indeed similar to Omnivoropteryx. This may make Omnivoropteryx a junior synonym of Sapeornis, and the name may be abandoned.”

Now that you can see
the two taxa together, do you agree that they are conspecific? BTW, they nest in separate clades in the large reptile tree.

Figure 4. Omnivoropteryx shares the plate with parts of another bird.

Figure 3. Omnivoropteryx shares the plate with parts of another bird.

Omnivoropteryx was preserved
with parts of another bird (Fig. The only data I have found comes from an X-ray.

Figure 3. Epidexipteryx, another scansoriopterygid with a bird-like pelvis.

Figure 4. Epidexipteryx, another scansoriopterygid with a bird-like pelvis. The toes are not known.

Epidexipteryx (Fig. 4) is a sister
to Omnivoropteryx. Both share a long third finger. Omnivoropteryx also has a long fourth toe. Unfortunately sister taxa do not preserve the toes. This clade produced some anurognathid mimics.

Figure 4. Sapeornis does not nest as a sister to Omnivoropteryx.

Figure 5. Sapeornis does not nest as a sister to Omnivoropteryx.

Sapeornis
is basal to living birds. The scansoriopterygid clade, of course, became extinct.

References
Czerkas SA and Ji Q 2002. A preliminary report on an omnivorous volant bird from northeast China.” In: Czerkas, SJ (editor): Feathered Dinosaurs and the origin of flight. The Dinosaur Museum Journal 1:127-135.

wiki/Omnivoropteryx

 

 

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