Jesairosaurus and the drepanosaurs leave the Tritosauria :-(

My earlier reconstruction
of the basal lepidosauriform, Jesairosaurus (Fig. 1; contra Jalil 1997, not a protorosaur/prolacertiform) included several errors based on attempting to create a chimaera of several specimens of various sizes based on scale bars. In this case, scale bars should not have been used. Rather fore and hind parts had to be scaled to common elements, like dorsal vertebrae, as shown below (Fig. 2). I think this version more accurately reflects the in vivo specimen, despite its chimeric origins. All of the partial skeletons assigned to this genus were discovered at the same Early to Middle Triassic sandstone site and two were touching one another. A larger skull, ZAR 7, shows the variation in size from the skull to shoulders remains of the ZAR 6 specimen.

Figure 1. New reconstruction of the basal lepidosauriform, Jesairosaurus (Jalil 1993).

Figure 1. New reconstruction of the basal lepidosauriform, Jesairosaurus (Jalil 1997). The wide and flat ribs are interesting traits for a likely arboreal reptile.

Mother of all drepanosaurs
The Drepanosauria is an odd clade of slow-moving arboreal reptiles that includes Hypuronector, Vallesaurus, Megalancosaurus and Drepanosaurus (Figs. 2, 3). Jesairosaurus was not a drepanosaur, but nested basal to this clade before the present revisions. It remains basal to the Drepanosauria now with revisions.

The revised reconstruction of Jesairosaurus 
shifts this clade away from Huehuecuetzpalli, Macrocnemus and the rest of the Tritosauria. Now Jesairosaurus and the drepanosaurs nests between Saurosternon, Palaegama and the so-called “rib” gliders, beginning with Coelurosauravus.

A short history of Jesairosaurus
Shortly after their discovery Lehman 1971 referred the several hematite encrusted specimens to the Procolophonida. Further preparation showed that they were referable to the Diapsida, according to Jalil (1990) and the, more specifically, to the Prolacertiformes (Jalil 1997) as a sister to Malerisaurus with Prolacerta as a common ancestral sister. Jalil did not include the closest sisters of Jesairosaurus as revealed by the present analysis.

With a much larger list of taxa,
the large reptile tree nests Malerisaurus between the Antarctica specimen assigned to Prolacerta (AMNH 9520) and the holotype of Prolacerta. Jesairosaurus, as mentioned above, nests with the basal lepidosauriformes. Any traits shared with protorosaurs are by convergence. Deletion of Jesairosaurus does not affect the nesting of the Drepanosauria as basal lepidosauriformes.

Figure 3. Drepanosaurs and their ancestor sisters, Jesairosaurus and Palaegama to scale.

Figure 3. Drepanosaurs and their ancestor sisters, Jesairosaurus and Palaegama to scale.

Arboreal
This new nesting shifts drepanosaurs closer to kuehneosaurs (Figs. 3, 4), another notably arboreal clade.

Figure 3. The new nesting for Jesairosaurus and the drepanosaurs as sisters to the Kuehneosaurs, several nodes away from Huehuecuetzpalli and the tritosaurs.

Figure 3. The new nesting for Jesairosaurus and the drepanosaurs as sisters to the Kuehneosaurs, several nodes away from Huehuecuetzpalli and the tritosaurs.

Certainly
there will someday be more taxa to fill in the current large morphological gaps in and around Jesairosaurus, but here’s what we have at present (Fig. 3) with regard to the origin of the so-called “rib” gliders (actually dermal rods, not ribs, as shown by Coelurosauravus) and the origin of the drepanosaurs.

Figure 4. Jesarosaurus to scale with sisters Palaegama and Coelurosauravus.

Figure 4. Jesairosaurus to scale with sisters Palaegama and Coelurosauravus.

The shifting of a clade
like Jesairosaurus + Drepanosauria occurred due to inaccurate reconstructions used for data. Science builds on earlier errors and inaccuracies. I let the computer figure out where taxa nest in a cladogram of 606 possible nesting sites, minimizing the negative effects of bias and tradition.

It’s sad
to see the drepanosaurs leaving the Tritosauria as it contains several oddly Dr. Seuss-ian variations on the tritosaur theme.

Also note the nesting
of the basal Rhynchocephalians, Megachirella and Pleurosaurus, between the palaegamids and the tritosaurs (Fig. 4). In the course of this study, both also received updates to their skull reconstructions. The former was difficult to interpret without knowing where it nested. What appeared to be an odd sort of a squamosal in Megachirella now appears to be a pair of displaced pleurosaur-like premaxillae. For Pleurosaurus I should not have trusted a prior line drawing by another worker. Here I used DGS to create what appears to be a more accurate skull without so many apparent autapomorphies.

References
Jalil N 1990. Sur deux cranes de petits Sauria (Amniota, Diapsida) du Trias moyen d’ Algerie. Comptes Rendus de I’ Academic des Sciences, Paris 311 :73 1- 736.
Jalil N-E 1997. A new prolacertiform diapsid from the Triassic of North Africa and the interrelationships of the Prolacertiformes. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 17(3), 506-525.
Lehman JP 1971. Nouveaux vertebres du Trias de la Serie de Zarzai’tine. Annales de Paleontologic (Vertebres) 57 :71-93.

 

 

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