Basal hominid, fenestrasaur and archosaur analogies

When you look at the transition
from quadrupedal locomotion to bipedal locomotion in early hominids (Fig. 1), among many other details, you can’t help but be impressed by the increase in the relative length of the hind limbs.

Figure 1. When hominids became bipedal, their hind limbs became longer.

Figure 1. When hominids became bipedal, their hind limbs became much longer.

The same can be said
for the transition from semi-bipedal Cosesaurus (based on matching Rotodactylus tracks) to the fully bipedal Sharovipteryx (Fig. 2).

Figure 2. Cosesaurus was experimenting with a bipedal configuration according to matching Rotodactylus tracks and a coracoid shape similar to those of flapping tetrapods. Long-legged Sharovipteryx was fully committed to a bipedal configuration.

Figure 2. Cosesaurus was experimenting with a bipedal configuration according to matching Rotodactylus tracks and a coracoid shape similar to those of flapping tetrapods. Long-legged Sharovipteryx was fully committed to a bipedal configuration, analogous to hominids.

As in hominids,
freeing the fore limbs from terrestrial locomotion enabled fenestrasaurs to do something else, like flapping for secondary sexual displays, adding motion to their morphological ornaments. While the forelimbs were relatively smaller in Sharovipteryx, they were relatively larger in Bergamodactylus (Fig. 3) a long-legged basal pterosaur. There were no constraints on forelimb evolution in fenestrasaurs, analogous to theropod dinosaurs that ultimately became birds. Some theropods and birds grew larger forelimbs, while others reduced their forelimbs.

Figure 2. Updated reconstruction of Bergamodactylus to scale with an outgroup, Cosesaurus.

Figure 3. Updated reconstruction of Bergamodactylus to scale with an outgroup, Cosesaurus.

Lest we not forget
in the basal archosaurs (crocs + dinos) early attempts at bipedal locomotion (Fig. 3) also corresponded to a longer hind limb length in bipedal Scleromochlus and Pseudhesperosuchus as opposed to their common ancestor, a sister to short-legged Gracilisuchus.

Figure 3. Short-legged Gracilisuchus, along with sisters, long-legged bipedal Pseudhesperosuchus and Scleromochlus.

Figure 3. Short-legged Gracilisuchus, along with sisters, long-legged bipedal Pseudhesperosuchus and Scleromochlus.

Based on those tiny hands,
the forelimbs of Scleromochlus were becoming vestiges. Based on the long proximal carpals of Pseudhesperosuchus, the manus was occasionally lowered to the ground, perhaps while feeding. The origin of bipedal locomotion in basal crocs is the same as in pre-dinosaurs.

It took much longer and proceeded more indirectly
for bipedal archosaurs to start flapping their forelimbs, giving them a new use that ultimately produced thrust and lift as bird forelimbs continued to evolve and become larger.

See videos produced by ReptileEvolution.com
on the origin of dinosaurs here, on the origin of humans here, and on the origin of pterosaurs here.

A sign of beauty and/or Olympic potential
is a long-legged model or athlete.

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