The antorbital and lateral temporal fenestrae of the frog , Rana

Earlier we looked at the evolution of the frog, Rana. And it continues to be the most popular blog post of the past year.

Today, after adding Rana to the matrix of the large reptile tree (still not updated), I think it’s time we looked at the antorbital fenestra of Rana, and the lateral temporal fenestra as well (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Rana, the bull frog, with naris in red, orbit in purple, antorbital fenestra in dark blue and lateral temporal fenestra in orange. The reduction of the the skull bones in Rana created these fenestrae.

Figure 1. Rana, the bull frog, with naris in red, orbit in purple, antorbital fenestra in dark blue and lateral temporal fenestra in orange. The reduction of the the skull bones in Rana created these fenestrae.

One usually thinks of additional skull fenestrae in the province of reptiles. As we saw earlier, the antorbital fenestra comes and goes in several reptiles. So does the lateral temporal fenestra. Amphibians (non-amniote tetrapods) typically do not have skull fenestrae. Neither to most basal reptiles.

Relative to the body, the skull of Rana is enormous. So are the hind limbs. Frogs leap, as everyone knows, and if the skull is going to be large it also has to be lightweight to enable longer leaps. So the skull bones are reduced to their bare minimum creating fenestrae.

Proximal outgroup taxa, including long-legged Triadobatrachus, likewise have reduced skull bones.

More distant outgroup taxa, including short-legged Gerobatrachaus and Doleserpeton and Utegenia have relatively smaller skulls and shorter hind limbs — and no skull fenestrae.

 

 

One thought on “The antorbital and lateral temporal fenestrae of the frog , Rana

  1. I’ll just say this is a living animal: we know which holes the nostrils lie in.

    I also hesitate to call the absence of the jugal (an autapomorphy of Batrachia) a lower temporal fenestra…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s