Palaeontology [online]

Header for website paleontology online.

Header for website paleontology online. Click to go to the website.

A website (new to me, but looks like it’s been around for awhile) palaeontologyonline.com is, in their own words,

“Palaeontology [online] is a website covering all aspects of palaeontology. The site is updated with articles about the cutting edge of research, by the researchers themselves. These are usually written by experts in the field, but are aimed at non-specialists. Articles vary widely in their content: some serve as an introduction to palaeontological or interdisciplinary fields, while others outline events in the history of palaeontology. Some contributions include summaries of recent findings and advances in rapidly evolving disciplines, and some focus on a particular geographic region or time period. Finally, some of our articles are based on the experience of being a palaeontologist – what life and work is really like as a fossil worker.  Our online format allows researchers to explain their work with the aid of an unlimited number of figures and videos.”

Commissioning editors (who are responsible for inviting contributions and overseeing the website) are:

Russell Garwood: Invertebrate palaeontologist; Peter Falkingham: Postdoctoral research fellow in the fields of vertebrate palaeontology and ichnology (trace fossils); Alan Spencer: Palaeobotanist; Imran Rahman: Postdoctoral researcher in invertebrate palaeontology and evolutionary genetics.

Some great pages here. Check out this placodont page.

The pterosaur page was written by Dr. David Hone, who states, “The origins and the relationships of the pterosaurs have long been contentious, although a consensus is forming on both issues. Often confused with dinosaurs, pterosaurs are members of their own clade, but are close relatives of their more famous cousins.

Over the years, palaeontologists have hypothesized that pterosaurs originated from various parts of the reptile evolutionary tree. Very early researchers considered them to be the ancestors of birds or even bats, and for a long time it seemed that they were probably basal archosaurs (the clade that contains dinosaurs, birds, crocodilians and some other groups). More recently evidence has begun to stack up that they are a separate group to the dinosauromorphs (dinosaurs and their closest relatives) but that the two groups evolved from a common ancestor. Most researchers now support this position. This makes pterosaurs reasonably close relatives to birds, but they are not bird ancestors as is sometimes wrongly reported.”

Well, par for the course…
Sad to see when there actually is a verifiable better relationship out there, but then that would involve actually acknowledging the literature (Peters 2000, 2002, 2007, 2009, 2011) and/or testing candidates one vs. another. But nobody wants to do this without fudging the data or reducing the inclusion set. It’s time to either recognize the literature or argue with it. The large reptile tree found a long line of pterosaur ancestors between Ichthyostega and Longisquama. Almost any one will do, as we learned earlier with turtles and pterosaurs.

References
Peters D 2000a. Description and Interpretation of Interphalangeal Lines in Tetrapods.  Ichnos 7:11-41.
Peters D 2002. A New Model for the Evolution of the Pterosaur Wing – with a twist. – Historical Biology 15: 277–301.
Peters D 2000b. A Redescription of Four Prolacertiform Genera and Implications for Pterosaur Phylogenesis. Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia 106 (3): 293–336.
Peters D 2007. The origin and radiation of the Pterosauria. In D. Hone ed. Flugsaurier. The Wellnhofer pterosaur meeting, 2007, Munich, Germany. p. 27.
Peters D 2009. A reinterpretation of pteroid articulation in pterosaurs. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 29:1327-1330.
Peters D 2011. A Catalog of Pterosaur Pedes for Trackmaker Identification
Ichnos 18(2):114-141. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10420940.2011.573605
http://www.reptileevolution.com/pterosaur-wings.htm

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