Looking for the Darwinopterus bits’n’pieces

This is a short trip through DGS using the YH2000 specimen of Darwinopterus (more completed than the holotype, but with a poorly preserved skull, (Lü et al. 2009). Crushed flat and spread eagle, one wonders whether this is a ventral or dorsal view. Without a prominent sternal complex and with such dark bones, it’s hard to tell at first glance (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Darwinopterus as published in Lu et al. 2009.

Figure 1. Darwinopterus as published in Lu et al. 2009.

The first thing we’ll do is play with the exposure to bring out the bones better (Fig. 2). Now we can see the scape are below the ribs.

Figure 2. Darwinopterus again with pelvic and pectoral regions brightened.

Figure 2. Darwinopterus again with pelvic and pectoral regions brightened.

Next we’ll add a layer in Photoshop and colorize the elements we’re interested in.

Figure 3. Bones colorized. Here the left scapulocoracoid is lavender/purple, the right one is magenta.

Figure 3. Bones colorized. Here the left scapulocoracoid is blue, the right one is magenta. Sternal complex in two parts in yellow. Where is the rest of it? For that matter, where is the right coracoid? I think it has drifted below the left scapula. 

The final step ghosts back the original image to bring out the tracings better. There’s the sternal complex, broken in two and tiny. Maybe parts are missing here. Prepubes in pink. One broken. A few drifted ventral pelvis parts here.

Figure 4. Ghosted image to bring out the tracing better. If bones are broken, you have to find both ends.

Figure 4. Ghosted image to bring out the tracing better. If bones are broken, you have to find both ends. One prepubis in pink is complete. The other is broken in two. I think that’s a right ischium beneath the broken prepubis above and a pubis below the proximal prepubis below. Second sacral has a broken tip. 

 

 

The final step is to apply your tracings to a reconstruction.

Figure 5. In situ and reconstruction of the YH2000 specimen of Darwinopterus.

Figure 5. In situ and reconstruction of the YH2000 specimen of Darwinopterus.

Earlier we looked at Darwinopterus here.

References
Lü J, Unwin DM, Jin X, Liu Y and Ji Q 2009. Evidence for modular evolution in a long-tailed pterosaur with a pterodactyloid skull. Proceedings of the Royal Society London B  (DOI 10.1098/rspb.2009.1603.)

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